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Zechariah 1-5

09.12.2010

On a busy night in early 519 BC, Zech has eight dreams:

Dream the First:  Zech sees horsemen who represent God’s omniscience and intimate knowledge of all the people and nations on earth.  The world being at rest while God’s people are not is unacceptable, so He announces that His judgment of Israel is over.  He has made it official that the rest of Israel’s history is not a story of punishment but of restoration and rebuilding and, ultimately, redemption.

Dream the Second:  The nations which have oppressed Israel, while ultimately carrying out God’s will of chastisement for His people, acted on their own sinful motivations.  They are duly punished.

Dream the Third:  Putting a positive (if prophetic) spin on Jerusalem’s unwalled and unprotected state, God promises to fill the New Jerusalem with so many of His people that walls would not be able to contain them.

Dream the Fourth:  The priesthood is restored and represents the people to God once again.  (I wonder if this takes into account the idea from Hebrews that Jesus has become the new priesthood and has obviated the role of intermediary between man and God by being both God and intermediary.)

Dream the Fifth:  Zerubbabel and co. will have to rely on guidance from God to complete their divinely appointed task; their own efforts disconnected from God will prove insufficient.

Dream the Sixth:  God’s covenant with man is displayed over the whole world like a flying billboard.  Whether Jewish or no, those that honor the covenant will be counted among God’s people; those that do not will be cursed.

Dream the Seventh:  Wickedness is removed from God’s people.  Wickedness’ personification as a woman is not meant to be misogynistic; rather, it stems from the prominent idol of the day, the goddess Asherah, and the fact that intermarriage with foreign women served to lead many into idolatry.

In order to leave you all on the edge of your seats, I will withhold the eighth dream until tomorrow…such a tease, I know.

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