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Thus Quoth – 4.17.11

04.17.2011

CS Lewis:

When I began to look into this matter I was shocked to find such different Christians as Milton, Johnson, and Thomas Aquinas taking heavenly glory quite frankly in the sense of fame or good report.  But not fame conferred by our fellow creatures — fame with God, approval or (I might say) ‘appreciation’ by God.  And then, when I had thought it over, I saw that this view was scriptural; nothing can eliminate from the parable the divine accolade, ‘Well done, thou good and faithful servant.’ 

With that, a good deal of what I had been thinking all my life fell down like a house of cards.  I suddenly remembered that no one can enter Heaven except as a child; and nothing is so obvious in a child — not in a conceited child, but in a good child — as its great and undisguised pleasure in being praised.  Not only in a child either, but even in a dog or a horse. 

Apparently what I had mistaken for humility had, all these years, prevented me from understanding what is in fact the humblest, most childlike, the most creaturely of pleasures — nay, the specific pleasure of the inferior: the pleasure of a beast before men, a child before its father, a pupil before his teacher, a creature before its Creator.

The Weight of Glory

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From → [cs/gk]

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